From The Mouth of The Sun – Woven Tide

Woven Tide is the debut album by From The Mouth of The Sun,
the new collaboration between Dag Rosenqvist, aka Jasper TX, and Aaron Martin.

AVAILABLE NOW FROM EXPERIMEDIA.NET
and other fine shops worldwide
LP – CD – DIGITAL

Stream the full album at BoingBoing.net
Download a free remix of Pools of Rust by Danny Saul.
Download a desktop wallpaper featuring the artwork of Chris Koelle.

” Out of the charred embers of dusk Woven Tide emerges with an incandescent glow. Each glimmer cast by the sustained notes of ebony keys, the taut strings of the cello, and the rampant buzz of guitar lights our way, gives us hope, brings us into the dawn of a new day. As From The Mouth of the Sun, the duo act as our torchbearers, scrawling messages along the walls of an elongated cave, toiling through the decayed remnants of fetid matter to create eight illuminating pieces. The listener, who has wiled away the hours, will find a door; Woven Tide will be the light out of the darkness.” – Michael Vitrano / Desire Path Recordings

Pieces from Woven Tide as well as solo work by Aaron Martin accompanies the new documentary film by Lost Hill Picture’s Ross McDonnell and Carter Gunn for Fastnet Films, Remember Me, My Ghost, which is currently touring the festival circuit. McDonnell and Carter are most recently known for their award winning documentary film Colony which documents the unexplainable phenomenon known as Colony Collapse Disorder that has left landscapes of empty beehives all across America, and also features music by Aaron Martin. An upcoming short film by McDonnell and Carter featuring Color Loss from Woven Tide will be included on an upcoming Wholpin DVD magazine published by McSweeney’s.

Since 2005 Gothenburg, Sweden based musician Dag Rosenqvist’s work has graced imprints including Miasmah, Fang Bomb, Under The Spire, Lampse, Lidar, Slaapwel, Kning Disk, Dead Pilot Records, Lowpoint, and Rural Colors.

Since 2006 Topeka, Kansas based composer Aaron Martin’s work has graced imprints including Preservation, Mobeer, Experimedia, Type, Under The Spire, and Sonic Meditations. Aaron’s most recent solo album, Worried About The Fire, is also available from Experimedia.

The Crossing
Pools of Rust
Color Loss
My Skin Drinks Light That Has Passed through Leaves
Sitting in a Roofless Room
Like Shadows in an Empty Cathedral
A Season in Waters
Snow Burial (While Blue Skies Gather)

All music recorded and mixed in Gothenburg, SE and Topeka, KS by
Dag Rosenqvist and Aaron Martin June – December 2010.

Cover artwork & layout by Chris Koelle.
Mastered by Taylor Deupree.

Video by Carter Gunn created for Sitting in a Roofless Room from archival footage courtesy of The Prelinger Archive in San Francisco, California. Carter is most recently known for his award winning documentary film Colony.

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REVIEWS

BoingBoing.net
From The Mouth of The Sun lie somewhere on the ambient spectrum near Eno’s Music for Airports and Tim Hecker’s (stunning) Ravedeath, 1972. Their debut, “Woven Tide,” is available later this month from Experimedia. The music can also be heard in the soundtrack for Remember Me, My Ghost, a new film by Ross McDonnell and Carter Gunn, directors of the hive death documentary Colony. That film was scored by Kansas-based composer Aaron Martin who, with Swedish musician Dag Rosenqvist, make up From The Mouth Of The Sun.

Acloserlisten.com
The key track on last year’s Jasper TX album, The Black Sun Transmissions, was the Aaron Martin collaboration, “Weight of Days”. Martin’s cello filled a void in Dag Rosenqvist‘s sonic world, while Rosenqvist’s electronics added grit to Martin’s clean classical vision. Fans wished for more interaction, and the artists agreed. The result is Woven Tide, an album of deep feeling and grace. It’s a natural heir to last year’s top collaborative effort, A Winged Victory for the Sullen, and it shares a similar tone: melancholic, yet ultimately uplifting. The closest companions in each artist’s discography are Jasper TX’s Singing Stones (especially “They’ve Flown Away and Left Us Here”) and Aaron Martin’s Chautauqua (referenced by the wordless vox in “Color Loss”). If pain is essential on the path to joy, then Woven Tide has gotten it right.

Most of the tracks feature deceptively simple yet devastatingly effective crescendoes. It’s amazing what one can do with a setup of piano, cello, guitar and electronics. Even in a brief piece like “Sitting in a Roofless Room”, subtle emotions run deep. The guitars spread a quiet mat for the piano to tread upon; the cello enters a step behind; they turn, recognize each other, and embrace. The volume rises as they are blanketed by a static swirl. And then – detachment. The piano limps off like a forgotten friend, while the cello stays behind to mourn. This pattern of approach and retreat recurs throughout Woven Tide, producing a downcast gravity. When the electronics fade from “Color Loss”, the effect is sorrowful, but when additional strings drop by, the effect is sadder still. The soul longs for relief, and at the same time, hopes that relief will never come, so articulate is the anguish, so seemingly impossible to recapture.

The album’s longest tracks set off in a more abstract direction. The hesitant pauses and brass timbres of “Like Shadows in an Empty Cathedral” call to mind Johann Johannsson’s The Miners’ Hymns, while the crackling drones of “A Season in Waters” spark atonal disruptions. This latter choice is the album’s only misstep, as the pulsating, off-the-beat static sounds like the warning hisses of a defective disc; a growing wall of sound would have been more appropriate. All is forgiven by the album’s coda, a bright, even accessible piece anchored by the strumming of an acoustic guitar. The digital edition also features Danny Saul’s remix of early album highlight “Pools of Rust” – longer and more bell-inflected, with piano excised, a highlight in its own right.

The key to the future success of any genre is a willingness to adopt and embrace the winning features of others. By blending the fields of ambient, drone and modern composition, Woven Tide embraces its title and presents itself as a brand new creation. (Richard Allen)

Antigravitybunny.com
Aaron Martin & Dag Rosenqvist (Jasper, TX) joining forces as From The Mouth Of The Sun, creating a refined beauty, not sounding like the radiant beast above us, but rather some further introverted giant. Unbelievably amazing, Martin & Rosenqvist an absolute perfect pair, masters of both acoustic & electronic, making strings & pianos melt, altogether clean, untouched, manipulated, processed, seamlessly perfect. Songs as tender as can be, with a serene sullenness in the Jasper crackle and Martin’s neo-layering. Not glowing or massive but still emotionally dense and overwhelming in its splendor, balancing the light of hope and the dark nightmares of reality. Woven Tide is so tragically good, it would almost be offensive if either of these guys decided to collaborate with anyone else. A true gem.

Tinymixtapes.com
The record label/mailorder haven Experimedia gives us Woven Tide, Dag Rosenqvist and Aaron Martin’s debut as From The Mouth of The Sun. I wrote previously about the Experimedia release from Lawrence English, which feels like a nice prelude to Woven Tide and particularly the track “Like Shadows In An Empty Cathedral.” Both conjure a certain physical weight through drifting bass tones and a beautiful higher register that never quite settles into a melodic context. In iTunes, the album’s genre tag is ‘Ambient Classical,’ and there is a certain kinship here to the hyper-consonant modern classical works that flourished in the 20th century. I think the notion that the sorrowful, strictly tonal billows of sound stand as a testament to ‘purity’ in the face of extreme dissonance is important to keep in mind. Though I’m not really sure what Rosenqvist and Martin set out to accomplish. I’m probably full of shit.

Zeneffects.wordpress.com
Lush and haunting, Woven Tide marks the first releases from From the Mouth of the Sun, the collaborative effort between Dag Rosenqvist of Jasper TX and composer Aaron Martin. Like Martin’s grave, woodsy 2010 effort Worried About The Fire (also released on Experimedia), Woven Tide conjures vivid imagery using sparse, subtle tools. Some tracks disintegrate and dissolve into warm, melodic resolutions, like the entrancing “Color Loss”; in others, tension builds to stunning moments of catharsis, most notably in the gorgeous “Like Shadows in an Empty Cathedral”. As a whole record, Woven Tide is a sublime and constantly shifting work: one that finds both of its illustrious creators in top form.

4zzzfm.org.au
From the mouth of the sun is a new collaboration between American Composer Aaron Martin (known for his releases through Australia’s Preservation label) and Swedish artist Dag Rosenqvist (a.k.a. Jasper TX). The result is a beautiful album of swelling string arrangements and minimalist piano with interwoven static and buzz. The instrumentation is balanced throughout, never petering out into obscurity and never overpowering. The album’s gradual crescendos and occasional background static are executed delicately allowing each piece to unravel at its own pace. The static in ‘Pools of Rust’ comes and goes subtly behind paced piano chords and long flowing ambient strings. The simple repeated piano line in ‘Sitting in a Roofless Room’ blends seamlessly with the strings never feeling forced or unwanted. What sounds like distant guitar strumming in ‘A Season in Waters’ never becomes more then the strum sound itself. The icing on the cake is the beautiful ‘Snow Burial’ closing the album with its slow strummed chords, pretty melody and soaring strings. Woven tide impresses with its simplicity, pace and it’s ability to flow between beautiful acoustic instrumentation and delicate electronic processing for a consistently engaging 44 minutes.- Adrian Marsh

Deerdiary1.blogspot.com
Dan Rosenqvist and Aaron Martin’s side project “From The Mouth Of The Sun” Woven Tide is a folk, ambient and post classical tour-de-force. Stunning, quite melancholic pieces for your indoors evenings. Mastered by Taylor Deupree. Out now on Experimedia.

Nofearofpop.net
All though you can argue this to be a bit of an early announcement, we simply can’t hold it back: From The Mouth of The Sun’s Woven Tide is already one of our favourite records this year, exploring the classical ambient space with bright, magnificent beauty. Being the result of a collaboration between Gothenburg’s Dag Rosenqvist (aka Jasper TX) and Topeka, Kansas composer Aaron Martin, both Godspeed You! Black Emperor and Berlin-based composer Mac Richter will instantely come to mind throughout its 44 minute long spin. However, I can’t help but drawing an additional line to Tim Hecker in Woven Tide; sometimes playing with vast elements of drone somewhere deep inside of their beautiful, organic creature. It almost fits a little too well to the sound of my own shoes walking down the slowly awaking streets of Berlin — adopting sounds from the environment like a soundtrack to a film, but with constant motion in this chaotic world.

Have a first listen to “Sitting in a Roofless Room” below, and don’t forget to look out for this musical journey on January 31 via Experimedia.

Textura.org
Album of the Month / Review / Spotlight

Yes, it’s early in the year, but don’t be surprised if Woven Tide, the incandescent debut album by From The Mouth of The Sun, eventually appears on any number of year-end lists when December arrives. This collaborative effort by Gothenburg, Sweden-based Dag Rosenqvist (otherwise known as Jasper TX, though the alias has now been retired) and Topeka, Kansas resident Aaron Martin is about as accomplished and fully realized a debut recording as one might hope to find. Their association began innocently enough when Rosenqvist asked Martin in 2008 to contribute a cello part to “Weight Of Days” on his The Black Sun Transmissions, and further contact eventually grew into the masterful Woven Tide.

In eight settings, ranging in length from one-minute to a dozen, Rosenqvist and Martin drench their strings, guitars, banjos, wordless vocals, and dust-covered pianos in hiss, with the result time-worn melancholy settings that stay with you long after the recording ends. Following the briefest of overtures (“The Crossing”), Woven Tide brings its plaintive world into focus via “Pools of Rust,” an initial high point in its expressions of mournfulness and longing. Here and in the recording’s other pieces, the duo’s various instrument sounds swell into shimmering, slow-moving pools of heartfelt supplications that are stirring. Their penchant for textural richness is nowhere more evident than on “Color Loss” where Martin’s cello appears to push its way through a thick mass of vinyl crackle until it breaks free and expresses its multi-layered lament with nothing holding it back. Initial statements by muffled horns (trombones and French horns) give “Like Shadows in an Empty Cathedral” a stately, even majestic quality that builds to an epic emotional pitch when strings, guitars, and other textures are folded into a sound mix that grows increasingly dense. The penultimate piece,“A Season in Waters,” casts its magical spell patiently, emerging as it does out of mist and growing in power and intensity as it undertakes its slow, twelve-minute ascent.

Without taking anything away from Rosenqvist’s contributions to the recording, it’s the affecting, open-hearted sound of Martin’s cello playing—clearly the album’s emotional center and most humanizing element (as heard during, for example, “Sitting in a Roofless Room”)—that recommends Woven Tide most. For Martin, Woven Tide thus constitutes a marvelous Experimedia follow-up to his solo release Worried About The Fire. The fact that the two opted to issue the album under a shared name rather than as, say, Martin & Rosenqvist hints that their commitment to the project might carry on beyond the debut outing; certainly the high quality of the release argues that the two definitely should continue working together under the From The Mouth Of The Sun name.

Who: We are Dag Rosenqvist in Gothenburg, Sweden and Aaron Martin in Topeka, Kansas (USA), two musicians sitting in separate rooms, recording lots of instruments, and thinking about life. We first worked together on a piece called “Weight of Days” from the album The Black Sun Transmissions by Jasper TX, which had been Dag’s main project up until that point. Aaron has recorded three albums for Preservation, one for Experimedia, and collaborated with a number of other musicians, including Machinefabriek, Part Timer, and Dawn Smithson as Winter’s Day.

What: We make warm, slightly processed music with an aim to guide the listener to an inner feeling of thoughtful isolation. We use piano, guitar, cello, and voice among other instruments to achieve this.

When: One piece from our debut album Woven Tide is featured in a new Irish short documentary called Remember Me, My Ghost by Ross McDonnell and Carter Gunn. The rest of the score is by Aaron Martin. The short is now making its way around the festival circuit.

Currently: Woven Tide is now available on Experimedia (CD/LP/Digital). We hope to record more in the future and maybe even do some shows.

Musical philosophy: We don’t have a strict musical philosophy, but we attempt to create music that is intimate and embraces the idea that two breathing bodies are creating something, rather than aiming for technical perfection.

Influences and inspirations: Water, snow, fallen leaves, Jacqueline du Pré, and the inevitable fact that human beings have a lifespan.

Headphonecommute.com
I feel like 2011 was the year of collaborations. A year when two truly amazing artists combined forces to produce something even more beautiful than they alone could make. Bear with me, and let me demonstrate. There was the stunning collaboration between Ben Frost and Daníel Bjarnason, titled SÓLARIS, the minimally blissed out record by Taylor Deupree and Marcus Fischer, In A Place Of Such Graceful Shapes, an incredible pairing by David Wenngren (aka Library Tapes) and Christopher Bissonnette on The Meridians Of Longitude And Parallels Of Latitude, an absolute perfect match between Hauschka and Hildur Guðnadóttir for Pan Tone, a gorgeous record by Dakota Suite and Emanuele Errante, The North Green Down, and an absolute mind blowing tour de force by A Winged Victory For The Sullen finding Dustin O’Halloran and Adam Bryanbaum producing one of the best records of the year. Whew!

I think I made my point. So could 2012 bring in another batch of matches made in heaven? I think Experimedia is trying to do just that! Kicking off the year with a gorgeous album, Woven Tide, this new duo is hopefully here to stay to keep aching for more. Let me introduce you to the happy couple. From The Mouth of The Sun begins with Dag Rosenqvist who is definitely not a newcomer to the scene. Known mostly for his Jasper TX moniker, Rosenqvist has been producing beautiful ambient landscapes, and sometimes darker drone caverns for labels such as Lidar, Slaapwel, Miasmah, Under The Spire and Fang Bomb.

Aaron Martin is the other half of the group. Martin is an incredibly talented cellist, recording multiple albums for Preservation label, above mentioned Under The Spire, and the very same Experimedia. Martin’s collaboration with Rutger Zuydervelt (aka Machinefabriek), titled Cello Recycling | Cello Drowning for Type turned many heads in 2007. Our eyes (and ears) have been since attuned to his works with Justin Wright, Dawn Smithson, and Part Timer, all just in time to get us excited for this amazing collab with Dag. Well, enough name dropping and catalog clawing, let’s get down to music, ’cause that’s why we’ve gathered here today!

Album Preview:

Gently bowed and carefully plucked strings rise above the humming hiss, lo-fi noise and molded field recordings. Piano chords guide the rhythm as the music swirls towards the light, lifting memory, melody and spirit. There’s something enigmatic and timeless about this journey through the vast landscapes, grieving mountains and abandoned homes. A needle left on a record is forever locked in its groove, clocking off a beat of crackle, clicks and fuzz. Voices sigh in empty cathedrals; the singing bowls vibrate the dust; and vinyl pops melt in the rain. Finally the cello sings. Its solo cry is perpetually lost in an agonizing minor chord, until the guitar strums pick it up. The album comes to its cinematic climax on an eleven minute epic peak, “A Season In Waters”.

“As From The Mouth of the Sun, the duo act as our torchbearers, scrawling messages along the walls of an elongated cave, toiling through the decayed remnants of fetid matter to create eight illuminating pieces. The listener, who has wiled away the hours, will find a door; Woven Tide will be the light out of the darkness.”

This is a very special album that is destined to stay in your mind, heart and soul. Released on Experimedia label, the record is available on CD, digital download, and an LP. A piece from Woven Tide as well as additional music by Aaron Martin appears on a documentary film by Lost Hills, Remember Me, My Ghost. Be sure to check out Jasper TX’s The Black Sun Transmissions (Fang Bomb, 2011) featured on our Best of 2011 list, Music For Bending Light And Stopping Time, as well as his exclusive mix for Headphone Commute, From Midnight To Sunlight. For more music from Aaron Martin pick up Worried About The Fire (Experimedia, 2011) and his collaboration with Justin Wright, Light Poured out Of Our Bones (Preservation, 2011). All are highly recommended.

editor’s note: answers provided by Aaron Martin (A) and Dag Rosenqvist (D)

How did you guys first meet, and what persuaded you to work together?
A: I had been aware of and admired Dag’s work as Jasper TX since I’ll Be Long Gone Before My Light Reaches You, but we didn’t first come into direct contact with one another until he asked me to record a cello arrangement for a piece called “Weight of Days” that appears on The Black Sun Transmissions album. That went well, and I was excited about the possibility of working on a longer project together. He felt the same way and we got started working on “Woven Tide” from there.

What does the name of your project mean?
D: The thing is I’d had this as a possible title for a while. But I just couldn’t seem to make it stick to anything And when Aaron and I started talking about actually giving this project a proper name I started thinking that it might actually work better as the name for a project rather than for a track or an album. It’s sort of a weird title for a project but once we decided on it. It just kind of stuck and now I couldn’t imagine this being named something else. Initially the title came to me in a dream where I was running up a hill and once I came to the summit I was blinded by this radiant bright sun reminding me of an Aztec Sun God. The light was so intense I could barely look at it and then it opened its mouth and out came a sound unlike anything I’ve ever heard. It was like the most overpowering drone I’ve ever heard, penetrating every fiber in my body, filling me with light. This was kind of the anti thesis to the image that spurred the initial concept for “The Black Sun Transmissions”. And no, I’m not a hippie and I’m not on drugs…

Talk about the recording process of Woven Tide.
D: I think we started talking about doing something together in the beginning of 2010 but I know I was very busy at the time and couldn’t really commit to anything right then. Then when Eyjafjallajökull forced the world to a standstill in April I got stuck in den Haag, The Netherlands for an additional three or four days during which I started playing around with some recordings of Trombone and French Horn I had done a couple of months earlier for another project. And during the course of those very insecure, chaotic and strange days I made the foundation to what was to become “Like Shadows In An Empty Cathedral”. And I actually think that Aaron had sent me a recording of an electric guitar (which is the foundation of “My Skin Drinks Light That Has Passed Through Leaves”) a while before this that I also started playing around with during that time. But the collaboration didn’t take off for real (at least for me, as I remember it) until I had left school in the beginning of June and was basically unemployed for almost two months. And from there on we started bouncing tracks and ideas back and fourth. I made most of the basic foundations in terms of chords and stuff like that for the tracks. And Aaron would send me sounds and recordings that I built even more foundations of. Some things emanated from previous recordings but transformed into something completely new. And once we had a foundation we would bounce that back and fourth a couple of times. Add stuff, mix and re-mix, add more, take away and mix some more. The whole process went quite fast and easy actually and I think that both of us wanted to keep it quite rough, at least that was one of my ambitions with this one. The main part of what I recorded was first-takes. Everything was very well recorded (in terms of recording quality/equipment) but I really wanted to keep a spontaneity about the whole thing and not over-work it. And that goes for the mixing and processing as well. Thinking about it now I don’t think we ever talked about what we wanted to do in terms of music, we kind of just let it take its course and see where it would take us. And it seemed to work fine. The album was basically done by mid-December or something like that. So it was a pretty quick one. From initial discussions to finished album in about a year. Fastest recording I’ve ever been a part of.

Your music is already full of emotion, and yet the titles of the tracks carry on a deeper meaning. What is the main theme behind the album and how is that reflected in the track names?
A: The album is intimate, but has a broader scope than my solo work, which often concerns specific events in my life. The music is like standing in a large, detailed room and absorbing the scope of space from afar, letting the feeling of space wash over you, rather than inspecting each ornamentation up close. During the time that we were working on the album, I did a short tour from Colorado down to New Mexico. I saw a photograph in Santa Fe of a woman sitting in a room with no roof. I carried this feeling with me for “Woven Tide” which coincides with the idea of surrendering to space, rather than trying to control it. Another similar image I kept in mind while recording was the vision of light passing through leaves. Giving in to the knowledge that we are enclosed by nature is an important thread that ties “Woven Tide” together. It’s like following a wire into the woods and letting go: there’s a sense of awe and bewilderment present throughout the music.

If this was a soundtrack to a movie, what would be the main protagonist’s story?
D: I have no idea to be honest. To me this is more about the ebb and flow of nature. For some reason I just came back to images of nature when I worked on it. And also when I listen back to it I see and hear water, meadows, rocks and sand in it.

Tell us about the appearance of your music on Remember Me, My Ghost. How did that collaboration come about?
A: Three pieces of my music had appeared in Ross McDonnell and Carter Gunn’s feature-length documentary Colony. The documentary showed at a festival a few hours from where I live and I was able to meet Carter. He showed interest in working with me more closely in the future and when he was editing Remember Me, My Ghost he had the idea to exclusively use my music (as well as one piece from “Woven Tide”) for the short documentary.

Given all the praise I sang for the album, I’m hoping that this project is here to stay. Do you think we’ll see and hear more?
D: Yes, that was actually one of the reasons why we choose a name for this duo, we could have just as easily called it Aaron Martin & Dag Rosenqvist or something along the lines of that. So yeah, I don’t know when or where but you will definitely hear more from us in the future!

I know both of you are very prolific artists. What are you working on right now?
D: Fall 2011 I experienced my first ever serious writers block but now I’m slowly making my way out of it. At the moment I’m working with the Gothenburg based dance company Iraqi Bodies and their new performance “Vowels”, set to premiere in Gothenburg in May 2012. I will continue working with the company also for the coming three-part project “Body & Identities” set to premiere during fall 2012. I’m also currently working with Edinburgh based sound artist Matt Collings in preparation for our upcoming UK tour. To start with, we’re doing an EP that will be available during our joint dates in April. I’ve also started making sketches for my next solo album. The entire concept is set so now I “only” need to make the music to go along with that. But when that will see the light of day is pretty much any ones guess.

A: I’m currently working on a release with a musician from New Mexico who records under the name Luperci. He plays sitar and heavily processes it. He did a remix for the recent “Worried about the Fire” remix tape “Stitched in Fire”. I’ve also been contributing cello parts to the new project of Maurice De Jong (Gnaw Their Tongues) called Seirom. That album should be out soon and there are already some unreleased tracks available. This spring I hope to start working on the first Winter’s Day full-length with Dawn Smithson.

Musicisgood.org
There seems to have been a recent flurry of new creative partnerships between established solo artists working in the generous borderlands between neo-classical, electronic, and ambient music. In fairly quick succession we’ve been treated to lovely debuts from A Winged Victory for the Sullen (Adam Wiltzie and Dustin O’Halloran) and Oliveray (Nils Frahm and Peter Broderick), with the first Orcas release (Benoît Pioulard and Rafael Anton Irisarri) on the horizon. Now add to that list Aaron Martin and Dag Rosenqvist (who has most commonly recorded as Jasper TX). Their debut album as From the Mouth of the Sun is to be released at the end of January on Experimedia, and is recommended listening.

In an interview for Fluid Radio, Rosenquist has described Woven Tide as “the perfect combination of the two of us: lush orchestrated parts, some noisier parts paired with drones and lots of acoustical instruments like cello, pump organ, banjo and piano.” That brief description sums up the album’s sound world pretty well – it sits in the growing creative space that has opened up at the intersection of experimental sound manipulation and classical piano and strings, but with the lyrical moments embedded in a forest of textured noise.

The opening track, titled ‘The Crossing’, is a brief fragment, just over a minute of sonic scene setting, yet it somehow seems important. The more times I listen to the album, the more these opening moments seem to offer a clue as to how to approach the rest. Guitar notes, a small echoing buzz, a hiss of static, resonant drones, strings – each of these enters, a new layer each few moments, and they seem to walk alongside and around each other without locking into a fixed configuration, layering into a complex aural environment but not merging. Soon the strings tentatively find harmony and swell a little – but just as it feels as if the track might take wing into something stirring and expansive, the momentum ceases and the sounds fade back to silence. The effect is rather like listening to an orchestra tuning before the concert begins – a purposeful yet non-linear climb to a brief swell of harmony, then, just when it feels as if we might be underway, the instruments fall silent.

Imagine an orchestra made up, yes, of cellos, a piano, a pump organ, a banjo, but also drones, the crackle of a vinyl run-out groove, hints of chant and of choral voices, fuzzy distortion, noise, chimes, wind-like sounds, creaking, cymbals. Now imagine this orchestra patiently, tenderly, skillfully exploring a path along which these various sounds neither mill around in chaotic dissonance nor fuse into a single glowing harmony, but rather tug evocatively at each other, flow around each other, layer above and below one another. Together they create an ever-active whole in which moments of yearning melody are patiently won from the crackling conversation without canceling it out. Imagine also a certain reticence, so that when strings or keys soar into sweetness or melancholy, the arc does not continue and blossom into full romantic technicolor, but withdraws again into the reflective interplay of melody and noise. Finally, imagine that all of this actually turns out far more accessible than it might sound – not a morass of esoteric experimentation, but a tuneful, touching musical journey that fans of, say, Stars of the Lid or Ólafur Arnalds might enjoy. ‘The Crossing’, brief as it is, points down this path, tunes us in, and the remaining tracks, while quite varied in sound as different instruments and motifs come to the fore, carry forward the same consistent aesthetic. The result is that although it would be easy to point to standout moments (listen, for instance, to Color Loss below, and wait for its resonant concluding section), the whole feels more like a single larger composition than a collection of tracks.

If allowed to fall into the background, the album easily slips by – I suggest that this is really an album for attentive, focused listening. The reticence that steers each piece away from flights of grandeur is also what allows the various sounds to coexist and lets each play its distinctive part without being absorbed into the whole. The album really came alive for me when I began to listen more closely to this interplay of multiple threads weaving around one another and to focus on the different textures in relationship to one another. There is often an exquisite sense of timing as one layer is hushed and another comes to the fore, creating a subtle drama from understated shifts of momentum. Pay attention, and there is a remarkably rich sound world here to explore, with many a moment of pensive beauty.

Pieces from the album are accompanying a documentary film project titled Remember Me, My Ghost, and it is easy to imagine this as an evocative film score. It also stands firmly on its own feet, however, as a rewarding piece of music. It is worth noting that Experimedia is offering a variety of remarkably well priced bundles ranging from the CD, vinyl LP, download and poster all together for $18 to the CD and download for $10. (You can also download a free remix of one track here). Whatever format works for you, be sure to give this one a listen.

Futuresequence.com
News came recently of Dag Rosenqvist’s intention to release his last album as Jasper TX early this year, and move on, in his own words, to ‘new beginnings’. His project From the Mouth of the Sun with friend and fellow noise experimenter Aaron Martin is the first of these, with another to follow with Matt Collings and hopefully more. Whilst Woven Tide, released by Jeremy Bible’s Experimedia label, may show glimmers of both artists recognised sounds – the album endeavours to achieve something altogether different. The result is immediately compelling; full of moments of painful melancholy, disarming emotion and intense bittersweet beauty.

Difficult to ignore is the stark juxtaposition of reverberated sound, and striped back instrumentation, delivered by guitar, violin, interjections of voice/choir, chimes and more. As an entry point to the album and sound, the one minuter The Crossing introduces this aesthetic perfectly, setting out the intent for the rest of the tracks. From here on in we are treated to a set of stories retold with a romanticised tenderness, full of rich imagery, and textures.

Color Loss left me speechless on first listen and continues to affect on subsequent sittings. Working around a relatively simple melody, Martin and Rosenqvist manage an aching mournfulness through repeated choral voices. In the second half, the voices give way to allow violins to continue the motif, establishing an even greater heart breaking melancholia. The same depth of sound is found in the violin notes of modern classical figure-head Richard Skelton, who works every vibration emanating from his strings into gloriously rich sculptural textures. The duo develop this surrounding noise, without ever losing the stark emptiness.

Shimmering cymbals, and a metallic reverberation of dust particles appear to penetrate via osmosis on My Skin Drinks Light That Has Passed Through Leaves – a fine mist of coloured light slowly changing, broken only by gently plucked guitar. Pinned piano leads the dramatical swell of strings and effected noise on Sitting In A Roofless Room, perhaps the albums most visceral and discordant moment, before fading into the distance.

The long introduction of A Season in Water holds us in suspense, as if drifting through murky water, before echoing strings emerge from out of the depths. The surge of sonics that develop is powerful and exciting. Throbbing electronics, synth cascades, washes of violins in heavy reverb, and at its height, and ending, music box chimes. At the end of this epic journey the emergent Snow Burial (While Blue Skies Gather) evaporates all heavy weights and sheds light on dark corners, climbing to its end.

These are tales of loss, cathartic euphoria, and hope from out of pain and despair. Rendered with such masterful artistry that I predict many will fall in love with Woven Tide. Mastered by Taylor Deupree and cover artwork by the always brilliant Chris Koelle completes the package and makes this a must have release.

Secretthirteen.org
From The Mouth Of The Sun is a debuting classical ambient music collaborative project between Dag Rosenqvist (known as Jasper TX), and composer Aaron Martin, formed in 2010. The artists are active in the academic music scene since 2005 and they carry now a considerable baggage of individual releases on record labels such Type, Miasmah, Preservation, Under The Spire. The whole project can be described as the cultural tilt between Sweden and America while Dag Rosenqvist is Swede who has perfectly mastered electric guitar and piano whereas Aaron Martin is a cello virtuoso from America, associated with ambient, abstract, experimental musical styles.

“Woven Tide” is a forthcoming album, which will be released as CD, 12″ Vinyl LP, and digitally by Experimedia in 31th of January, 2012. The whole work consists of 8 expansive and generous compositions, which were painstakingly mastered by the professional audio engineer Taylor Deupree. The ambience of the whole work varies from sublime soundscapes where sustained musical textures create emotive fusion between real and programmed sound to cracked bleeps. Authentic feeling of cathedral sounding is created by both Rosenqvist’s thoughtfully recorded sensitive minimal piano notes and panoramic guitar chords, fused with Martin’s whirling cello. Gently used musical effects with live recordings and unnoticeable integration into wholeness proves mature musical skills and knowledge.

“Woven Tide” is like a sentimental musical tale about the breeze which blows the harmonious love waves to the existential life shore.

Everythingischemical.blogspot.com
From the Mouth of the Sun marks the first time the visions of musicians Aaron Martin and Jag Rosenqvist (Jasper TX) come together. If you know the background of each of these artists, this collaboration is no surprise. For years Martin and Rosenqvist have sculpted their work in the ambient scene with the same brand of wintry soundscapes, each taking their own approach. Martin strips his work of limitation, using the language of music at its most free and expressive, following the unbounded voice of his cello. Rosenqvist flirts with realtime layering and organic beats, retaining a more Classical form. These aesthetics merge on W’oven Tide’ to create an album that reigns among the pair’s greatest works.

On ‘Woven Tide’, we are immediately thrown into a place far from home. “The Crossing” paints a surreal world full of white noise and melancholic drones, but the pastoral strings give the song an eerie familiarity. All familiarity is thrown out the window, however, on “Color Loss.” A claustrophobic Industrial beat layered against a spectral voice stretching like a wind instrument sounds so otherworldly it’s scary. Imagine a futuristic, industrial wasteland, and you’re on the right track. “Like Shadows In An Empty Cathedral” abandons any staunch Minimalism. Droning organs punctuated with epic brass leads mimic the scope of Sigur Ros, until the intimacy maintained on the rest of the album pulls through with whirring violins and bands of static. A mythic, majestic landscape fading into the dark fog is all that comes to mind.

It’s crucial to mention ‘Woven Tide’ began as a soundtrack for the film, ‘Remember Me, My Ghost’. I’m not positive on the documentary’s subject, and honestly, this album doesn’t give much insight. Its array of aesthetic investigations give us a world of worlds, but without the guideline of the film, the story behind ‘Woven Tide’ lies hidden. View From The Mouth Of The Sun’s debut as a template for your own movie; that’s the best way to enjoy it. Fall back, listen, and paint the scenes in your head. You’re bound to be taken on a journey.

Standout Tracks: Pools of Rust, Sitting In A Roofless Room, Like Shadows In An Empty Cathedral

SSGmusic.com
The newly minted combination of the man behind Jasper TX, Dag Rosenqvist, and composer Aaron Martin makes up From the Mouth of the Sun–and as any fan of either’s work can tell you, Woven Tide is going to be a stoic, somber ride through musicality.

Woven Tide is a calculating album, only showing itself in listless flashes better suited for headphones than an overpowering stereo system. Subtly is brilliance as it pertains to Rosenqvist and Martin’s own work, and as a duo the formula doesn’t change. The inherent crackle and antebellum appeal of Rosenqvist is gingerly melded by Martin into his fuller, yet reigned compositions. When the pair ratchets up the intensity (the album’s final ‘suite’ of “Like Shadows in an Empty Cathedral” and “A Season in Waters”), the payoff is well worth the patience.

Rosenqvist and Martin seem suited toward each other’s strengths, leaving us to hope more is produced from the formidable duo. Comparisons will be made to A Winged Victory for the Sullen and in some regard; the point won’t be far off. The larger issue is how wonderful it is that contemporary composition is returning to music—not as polish on a trumped up presence on a pop song—but as mood, melody, and substance that coexists with modern temperance.

Foxydigitalis.com
This collaboration between Aaron Martin and Dag Rosenqvist (Jasper TX) is beautifully made and very well-written. Both of these musicians have a great deal of talent. The album’s slow passages of strings, piano, and organ — played in a contemporary classical style against waves of static — have a profound amount of depth and focus, and there is a nocturnal quality to the music here that calls to mind an imaginary walk through an empty London or New Orleans street a century ago.

Tinymixtapes.com
The record label/mailorder haven Experimedia gives us Woven Tide, Dag Rosenqvist and Aaron Martin’s debut as From The Mouth of The Sun. I wrote previously about the Experimedia release from Lawrence English, which feels like a nice prelude to Woven Tide and particularly the track “Like Shadows In An Empty Cathedral.” Both conjure a certain physical weight through drifting bass tones and a beautiful higher register that never quite settles into a melodic context. In iTunes, the album’s genre tag is ‘Ambient Classical,’ and there is a certain kinship here to the hyper-consonant modern classical works that flourished in the 20th century. I think the notion that the sorrowful, strictly tonal billows of sound stand as a testament to ‘purity’ in the face of extreme dissonance is important to keep in mind. Though I’m not really sure what Rosenqvist and Martin set out to accomplish. I’m probably full of shit.

Dwars.radio6.nl
Verrassend was de mededeling in december vorig jaar op de blog van de Zweedse multi-instrumentalist Dag Rosenqvist dat hij besloot, om na elf jaar als Jasper TX muziek te hebben gemaakt, er een punt achter te zetten en dat er nog slechts een album van Jasper TX zal verschijnen, ‘An Index Of Failure’. Dat Dag Rosenqvist niet geheel met muziek stopt, slechts met Jasper TX, blijkt wel uit de vele projecten die er op stapel staan, waaronder het debuut ‘Woven Tide’ van From The Mouth Of The Sun die nu bij Experimedia is uitgekomen. From The Mouth Of The Sun is de samenwerking van Dag Rosenqvist met Aaron Martin en het product ‘Woven Tide’ is meteen een mooi voorbeeld dat het geheel meer is dan de som der delen. Want Aaron Martin maakt met instrumenten als cello, piano, speelgoedinstrumenten en de nodige loopstations, stijlvolle neo-klassieke stukken waarin vooral melodieën voorop staan, terwijl Dag Rosenqvist met Jasper TX juist zeer zwaar op hand liggende ambiente klankclusters produceert. De afzonderlijke kwaliteiten van beiden worden op ‘Woven Tide’ samengesmolten tot een indrukkenwekkend geheel.

Clubbingspain.com
Como una luz brillando en la oscuridad, así avanzan los sonidos de From The Mouth of The Sun cuando aparecen desde el vacío en Woden Tide, su álbum de debut. El sueco Dag Rosenqvist aka Jasper TX y el norteamericano Aaron Tide construyen un disco entre el ambient y la música clásica y entrelazan los instrumentos y la electrónica como las mareas del título del álbum. El disco saldrá a la venta el 31 de enero vía Experimedia.

Fluid-radio.co.uk
It’s late 2008, and Dag Rosenqvist asks Aaron Martin for a cello part for his then work-in-progress, ‘The Black Sun Transmissions’…

That initial request grows into a gradual exchange of musical DNA, part being a recording of an electric guitar from Martin. Rosenqvist, suffering an enforced layover in The Netherlands due to Icelandic ash in the 2010 eruption of the volcano Eyjafjallajökull, starts working on that guitar part, which becomes music, which eventually becomes From The Mouth Of The Sun, which leads to the creation of ‘Woven Tide’, which is to be released by Experimedia on January 31st.

So, amongst the lost opportunities and missed deadlines that the grounding of air travel had in 2010, an amazing record emerges from the volcanic ash; literally from the mouth of the sun.

The album has seemingly been on the horizon for several months (if not longer), with Rosenqvist having mentioned it here on Fluid as early as November 2010 in an interview with Alex Gibson, discussing his collaboration with Simon Scott, ‘Conformists’ –

“I’m also working on a collaboration with multi-instrumentalist Aaron Martin. We’ve completed five tracks and four more are in the works. In my mind this is the perfect combination of the two of us: lush orchestrated parts, some noisier parts paired with drones and lots of acoustical instruments like cello, pump organ, banjo and piano. This should be out … sometime closer to summer 2011.”

So, given that this work had been crawling over the horizon for quite a while, we all felt pretty keen to know the story behind the epic album. Martin and Rosenqvist kindly discussed the project by email over the last few months, during which time at least one interesting development occurred…

Rosenqvist posted on his blog in late December that he is retiring Jasper TX with one last release, ‘An Index Of Failure’, his comment being “Eleven years is enough I think.” Luckily for listeners of both, Martin and himself plan to continue on with From The Mouth Of The Sun, but the year that produced the record seems to have been eventful one for all concerned…

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Did you two know one another from prior to 2008?

AM: No. The first time we came into direct contact with one another was when Dag asked me to do the arrangement for “Weight of Days”. I had been aware of and enjoyed his work as Jasper TX since his album on Lampse, and always felt a connection with what he was doing, though. At that point, I hadn’t had any of my music released, so I never anticipated working together with him on an album. I was pleasantly surprised that we worked together well, and had similar ideas about how to make things work nearly every step of the way.

How did you first cross paths?

DR: The first time I heard of Aaron was when Rutger sent me the ‘Cello Recycling’ 3″. And I immediately liked the approach. There was something raw in it that I really liked so when I started planning for “Weight of Days” I knew that I wanted Aaron to play the cello on it.

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For those not familiar with it, the Cello Recycling project was originally commissioned for use in an art gallery, presumably as an installation piece; Rutger Zuydervelt, better known as the somewhat prolific Machinefabriek, took cello improvisations from Martin and built them into a slow-burning post-ambient monster. The project was later released on Type with Martin’s take on Rutger’s work, “Cello Drowning”, two sides of the same tarnished coin.

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Where did From The Mouth Of The Sun come from?

DR: Well, I had asked Aaron do record some cello parts that I had written for the track “Weight Of Days” off of ‘The Black Sun Transmissions’. This was back in 2008, I think. So he recorded them and also added some excellent ideas of his own to the recordings. Then he used some of those recordings for the track “Water Tongue” off his ‘Worried About The Fire’ album on Experimedia.

And when he asked me to contribute a remix for an upcoming tape featuring remixes of the entire album I knew I just had to work on “Water Tongue” that in turn contained parts of recordings he had done for me earlier… So there’s actually a connections between those three albums.

How long did the record take, from where it started as an idea to the finished product?

DR: I think we started talking about doing something together in the beginning of 2010 but I know I was very busy at the time and couldn’t really commit to anything right then. Then when Eyjafjallajökull forced the world to a standstill in April I got stuck in den Haag, The Netherlands for an additional three or four days during which I started playing around with some recordings of Trombone and French Horn I had done a couple of months earlier to another project. And during the course of those very insecure, chaotic and strange days I made the foundation to what was to become “Like Shadows In An Empty Cathedral”.

And I actually think that Aaron had sent me a recording of an electric guitar (which is the foundation of “My Skin Drinks Light That Has Passed Through Leaves”) a while before this that I also started playing around with during time. But the collaboration didn’t take off for real (at least for me, as I remember it) until I had left school in the beginning of June and was basically unemployed for almost two months. Then I can’t really remember but I think the album was done like mid-December or something like that. So it was a pretty quick one. So from initial discussions to finished album in about a year.

How did the creative process work between the two of you?

DR: I think I made the basic foundations in terms of chords and stuff like that for most of the tracks. And Aaron would send me sounds and recordings that I built even more foundations of. Some things emanated from previous recordings but transformed into something completely new. And once we had a foundation we would bounce that back and fourth a couple of times. Add stuff, mix and re-mix, add more, take away and mix some more.

The whole process went quite easily actually and I think that we wanted to keep it quite rough, at least that was one of my ambitions with this one. I know that most of what I recorded was first-takes. Everything was very well recorded but I really wanted to keep a spontaneity about the whole thing and not over-work it too much. And that goes for the mixing and processing as well. Thinking about it now I don’t think we ever talked about what we wanted to do in terms of music, we kind of just let it happen and see where it would take us.

And it seemed to work fine.

Do you feel like you captured the rough spontaneity you wanted in the recording? Is it a goal for both of you to keep the life in the music, to not over-work it?

AM: I feel like the album is nice combination of spontaneity and refinement. I tend to record in long takes, rather than piecing together multiple takes. I think that gives the music a more intimate feel. ‘Woven Tide’ has a lot of string arrangements, though, which requires quite a bit of preparation beforehand, and a lot of focus to capture in long takes. I think a lot about what I want to with each individual track as I’m preparing a part, but once I hit record, I allow some room to feel the music out and try something new in the moment. With all of the music I’m involved with, it’s important for me that the listener sense the life behind the music. If the music sounds too pristine or you can no longer penetrate the human element involved in the recording process, I feel like that creates too much distance between the artist and the listener.

DR: I think that I generally tend to over think things a lot when I make music. I am always very critical to what I do and I tend to obsess over minor details. And to some extent I tried to let a bit of that go when we made this album. I always try to record things with good quality audio chains, from the microphone to the preamp and so on. And I think I focused even more on that for these recordings and rather than processing the sounds I tried to just leave them as they were.

Of course I used effects, both while recording and while mixing, but not to the extent I normally do. I wanted to keep the natural sound of things, including all it’s flaws. If the music is too perfect then it loses something. There has to be some grittiness and some dirt in it in order to appeal to me. And that’s where analogue equipment makes all the difference. Using a real piano rather than samples, running things through outboard compressors, tape echoes, reverbs etc. When you use analogue effect chains you allow for the element of chance that often surprises you in unexpected and lovely ways.

Is there a “theme” for the record?

AM: ‘Woven Tide’ has some subconscious themes and layers of meaning that appear throughout, but we didn’t set out with any themes in mind. It would be difficult to pinpoint exactly how to express these meanings, or even if Dag and I would be in agreement on what they are. I think the album coheres quite well as a whole and the listener is free to simply listen or to think about what themes are holding the music together.

DR: I don’t thing there’s a “theme” for it but for me it’s about nature, the ebb and flow of the seasons and the beauty and fury of nature, the shifts and changes. But it’s not a theme that we both agreed on, it’s just a feeling I had while recording and that I get when listening to it now.

Aaron, can you also hear the ebb and flow that Dag talks about?

AM: Yes, I definitely hear that. I think a lot of the music has to do with observing elements in nature or in one’s life that are too substantial for an individual to impact.

In that way, ‘Woven Tide’ has a wider scope with more abstract meaning than my solo work, where the music often concerns specific memories and events in my life.

Dag, you mentioned a love of grit and imperfection; can either of you point to where that influence came?

DR: To me the grittiness comes as a very natural thing. I don’t like recordings that are too perfect. There’s just nothing that kind of get me going when I hear something that is too perfect. I like to have good recording equipment in terms of microphones and outboard effects so that I can capture the frequencies I want in a recording, but I don’t want things to sound too clean and crisp. You have to include and embrace the element of chance when recording. All of a sudden something that you could never plan for seeps into a recording and that minor little thing might just be the thing that makes or breaks the whole recording, if you get what I mean?

I also think it’s a combination of me growing up listening to old jazz records and stuff like The Rolling Stones, Ramones and The Sex Pistols where you can hear that it’s someone actually playing an instrument. I also grew up listening to death and black metal and there’s tons of dirt in those recordings. Or at least it used to be.

I think it all comes down to what you want to achieve in a recording. Sometimes there’s a point in lining stuff straight into the pre-amp too. It’s all about esthetics and choices.

AM: The impetus for me came from both the instruments I use and how I learned to record music. I use a lot of acoustic instruments that are often unprocessed, and when I first started recording, I used a 4-track recorder. A lot of my habits from that beginning period have carried over (many have also been refined). Both of those elements lend themselves to imperfections that give the music a different kind of depth than recordings that are created in a more sophisticated environment.

Has the project spawned any other material that will come out at another point? What’s next for both of you?

DR: At the moment we aren’t working on anything but we definitely plan to do more. That was one of the things when choosing a band name for this, we wanted it to be more than just a one-off thing. The thing is that this collaboration worked so well between us, it was kind of intuitive so it would be a shame not to do more really.

I have a collection of odd bits and pieces that were collected over the last 5-6 years coming out this spring on the American label Handmade Birds. It’s a vinyl entitled ‘An Index of Failure’.

The album was mastered by James Plotkin and right now my fellow studio colleague, musician and friend Thomas Ekelund is hard at work with the cover for it. Which will look absolutely stunning by the way. It’s a collection of tracks that, for various reasons, didn’t get a proper release. Some of them are collaborations that didn’t pan out and some are from compilations that never got done.

It’s not a B-side kind of thing but rather a “best of” unreleased tracks. It actually features on track that I started working on and sent to Aaron for our collaboration. But we discarded it because it didn’t sit right with the rest of the tracks off of “Woven Tide”. So I decided to finish it on my own instead and it turned into something completely different…

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It’s worth mentioning at this point that this dialogue comes from early November last year and may sound somewhat dated, given Dag’s decision to retire Jasper TX. While we were in the process of finalizing this interview, Dag agreed to go through a retrospective of his releases for a future article, so there is an adjunct to this dialogue to follow, likely in the next few months…

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DR: I also have an album with another duo project called The Silence Set coming out sometime during spring 2012. The duo consists of myself and Johan G. Winther, who’s released tons of excellent music under the Tsukimono moniker. The album is called ‘Teeth Out’ and will be released on Swedish label Fang Bomb. It’s kind of broken lo-fi mixed with some noise elements, proper songs with vocals and everything.

But don’t worry, I’m not singing on it. But we got the wonderful Heather Woods Broderick to write lyrics and sing on one of the tracks, which might just be one of the most beautiful things I’ve ever been a part of. We got Nils Frahm to record and produce Heathers vocals and he also added some modular synthesizer. Believe me when I say it’s magical.

AM: Not yet, but I’m looking forward to working with Dag again as soon as we both have time to do more. Next up for me will be a release with a musician from New Mexico who records under the name Luperci. He plays sitar and heavily processes it. He did a remix for the recent “Worried about the Fire” remix tape ‘Stitched in Fire’.

I’ve also been contributing cello parts to the new project of Maurice De Jong (Gnaw Their Tongues) called Seirom. That album should be out soon and there are already some unreleased tracks available. A new Irish documentary short called “Remember Me, My Ghost” features eight pieces of my music and one ‘Woven Tide’ piece, as well, which is pretty exciting.

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And the album itself?

As you would expect from these two, it is a very accomplished piece of work. There are a number of elements that distinguish it from other similar collaborative releases, primary amongst them a scope of sound used and a sense of mature restraint that reins in some of the more potentially direct pieces. The tracks vary in length from one-minute intros to ten-minute epics, and there’s a broad range of sounds and instruments; piano, guitar, sparse vocals, cello (obviously) and number of unidentifiable tonal elements that weave in and out.

Tracks like “Colour Loss” are good examples of this, with a simple melody directed through many iterations and guises, starting simply and quietly and eventually developing into a layered stringed hiss. One striking feature of the pieces is their well resolved nature; rather than being just random splashed paint on the canvas, all the ideas are developed out fully, given their due and then resolved neatly within the confines of the song. The clearly identifiable starts and ends of each track mean that the album has a sense of depth to it – at no stage do you feel as a listener that you’ve come in midway through something, and as a result the eight tracks have a resolved nature to them that make the album, as a listen, feel much longer time-wise than it is. It doesn’t overstay its welcome, but still feels substantial.

Given how long the album was in development for, the temptation must surely have been to rework it constantly, but both parties have achieved their stated aim of keeping a loose energy to it whilst it still sounds considered and detailed. Walking that fine line, tonally, is the triumph of the project.

The grit and spontaneity that both mention could very well be the “woven tide” of the title; mic noise, tape hiss, hums and rumbles fade in and out in a remarkably subtle fashion, almost to the point the their presence is almost indistinguishable from the music (“Pools Of Rust”), only really able to be focused on in context when their sudden removal highlights their absence.

The mastering is grand as usual from Taylor Duepree, and the artwork by Chris Koelle is both detailed and sparse. ‘Woven Tide’ is to be released worldwide on January 31 2012 on CD, 12″ vinyl LP, and digitally. Direct pre-orders for an exclusive bundle with poster are available NOW from Experimedia.

A digital pre-release copy will be included for download with all formats immediately upon ordering in choice of Flac, Apple Lossless, and Mp3.

Woven Tide will be available from independent retailers beginning January 31 2012. Also worth mentioning is a very fine free remix of the track “Pools Of Rust” by Danny Saul available at Soundcloud –

Our thanks again to both the artists (also photographers Laura Steele & Andy Glaser for the use of their work) for their time and involvement, and also a strong recommendation to all reading to not miss this rare occurrence, woven in sound.

– Charles Sage for Fluid Radio